Take A Look Inside This Adorable $4,000 Home— It Was Created By A 3D Printer And Built In Only 1 Day

Inadequate housing has become a global problem. Yale University conducted a research study that revealed that more than 150 million people from different parts of the world are homeless. Shockingly, about 1.6 billion of those lucky enough to have a roof over their heads live in conditions below the required standards.

Recently, two companies applied their creative designs to help curb the problem of homelessness. One of the companies, Icon, was primarily formed to create long-lasting and decent building solutions that could be easily adopted by anyone.

The Austin-based company came into a partnership with New Story, an organization that focuses on building affordable homes, for the noble project.

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Together, they came up with a creative project to end the world’s housing inadequacy menace. They launched it in 2018, during the South by Southwest Conference that was held in Austin.

 The project was indeed innovative. It unveiled the first ever 3D printed structure that would cost way less than the standard house and take only a day to erect. As it stands, the price of the home is quoted at $10,000, but they are aiming to cut down the cost by $4,000 in future.

This new invention involves building a home using a huge 3D printer referred to as Vulcan. The machine was built and tested by Icon and New Story. Just like the normal printer uses ink, the Vulcan utilizes the mortar technology to print out walls, section after another.

The machine has a high output power that helps the contractor erect the walls, flooring, and roofing in as little as 12 hours.

The rest of the 12 hours are left for the contractors to install windows, electrical wiring, plumbing and doors for a complete home. An ideal 650-square foot home is welcoming and decent with large beautiful windows.

A patio surrounds two parts of the house wall to create a space for outdoor resting. Inside is a living room, a small office area, a spacious bedroom, and a simple bathroom. This is everything that you would want in a simple house.

The innovative companies plan to erect at least a hundred units in El Salvador within the next twelve months. There are plans to start erecting more in the United States. The two companies are aware that it will take time for people to adapt and accept this new technology of building 3D-printed houses.

The project, however, tackles all problems, and this makes it practical. It allows for flexibility and gives clients broad customization features, unlike the traditional structures. The project also reduces the wastage of resources when building innovative 3-printed houses.

Isn’t this project mind-blowing? It does look like the future is here with the introduction of these 3D printed houses. Would you live in a 3D printed home? Let us know what you think - and feel free to pass this along to your friends and family!