Baby Born 12 Weeks Prematurely Is Among The Smallest To Ever Survive

A premature baby from India is proving to all the world that nothing is impossible when people act out of love.

Manushi was born in Rajasthan in northern India. The sweet little girl was born 12 weeks too early, weighing only 0.8 pounds and measuring a slight 8.6 inches.

With undeveloped organs, extremely fragile skin, and hands and feet no bigger than a thumbnail, doctors told Manushi’s parents, Seeta and Giriraj, that their little girl only had a 0.5 percent chance of survival.

Nonetheless, the family and medical staff persisted, giving little Manushi every chance at life. Placed in an incubator, doctors fed Manushi all the essential vitamins and nutrients her little body needed before she was able to drink milk. After a long fight, Manushi won the battle. Once she had reached a hefty 5.2 pounds, she was released from the hospital.

apost.com

Premature births are fairly common, both domestically and internationally. In the United States, doctors estimate that about 1 in 10 babies are born prematurely. Unlike Manushi’s case, most preemies are born only a few weeks early.

Premature babies born shortly after conception have a much higher mortality rate. These extremely premature babies are at risk for a host of health problems, including respiratory distress syndrome and bleeding in the brain.

These conditions are compounded by skin that is often paper-thin and weak immune systems, leaving these children at higher risks of developing infections. Premature babies are also in danger of other complications later in life, such as developmental and learning difficulties, hearing and vision problems, and even cerebral palsy.

Manushi’s case is not the only example of an extremely premature child surviving their first months of life. In 2014, a little girl from Texas was born 21 weeks after conception, weighing only 0.9 pounds

Doctors warned the child’s parents that their little girl was born too early to survive outside of the womb, but the parents insisted on giving their baby a chance. Thanks to her parent’s encouragement, the little girl now leads a normal life.

In Manushi’s case, doctors also wanted to show the community the value of life. Infanticide is a major problem in Rajasthan, particularly for female babies. To demonstrate all the services and care the residents of Rajasthan have at their fingertips, doctor’s waived Manushi’s hefty medical bills.

What do you think of how Manushi and her family beat the odds? Stories of people fighting against the odds and winning are always inspiring, aren't they? Tell us your thoughts in the comments and be sure to pass this article along to others!